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Finding The Apes

Posted on January 21st, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Resources.

Perhaps the most fascinating, irresistible and charming creatures in Africa are the Apes.  Hidden in the dense jungle and rainforest areas, Africa’s gorillas and chimpanzees require time and effort to visit.  But the rare opportunity to share time with our distant cousins will be one of the highlights of your safari.

Mountain Gorilla

Gorilla gorilla beringei  Mountain gorilla

Quick Facts

  • The largest living primate, an adult male gorilla can be 1.8 meters tall and weigh 180kg.
  • Gorillas live in family groups, called troops, with up to 30 members.
  • Highly sociable, gorillas form strong attachments to members of their troop.
  • One mature male, known as the Silverback, normally acts as leader and chief protector.
  • Gorillas inhabit dense forest and rainforest, wandering over a 15-25km home range.
  • Feeding and resting through the day, gorillas build nests from bent branches or grasses each evening.
  • Gorillas are shy and retiring and will seek no trouble unless harassed.  But they will fiercely defend their family group when threatened.
  • Twenty-five distinct vocalizations are recognised and used for group communication in the dense vegetation.
  • There are only 880 mountain gorillas left in the world.

Where to See the Gorillas

  • Approximately 480 gorillas inhabit the Virunga Ranges.  This extinct volcanic region runs along the borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • The remaining gorillas inhabit Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in southwestern Uganda.

 About Visiting the Gorillas

  • Getting to see the gorillas is not easy and there are no guarantees.
  • At least a moderate level of fitness is required as you will have to trek through thick vegetation and up steep slopes in search of the gorillas.  The trek can last for several hours.
  • Local guides keep track of the animals, but they move daily and are not easy to track.  Visitors have been disappointed.
  • Your time with the gorillas is limited to 1 hour and facemasks may be required to prevent transmission of disease.
  • You may not use a flash, so choose your lens accordingly.
  • You will require an official permit to see the gorillas.

 

Western Lowland Gorilla

western lowland gorilla

Quick Facts

  • The smallest subspecies of gorilla, the average male still stands 1.6m tall and weighs 168 kg.
  • Compared to mountain gorillas there is a greater gender size difference, with females being half the size of males.
  • Endangered but far more common and widespread than the mountain gorillas.
  • Females don’t start reproducing until around 9 years old, and they generally have one offspring every 5 years.
  • When males reach maturity they go through a “bachelor stage” that can last several years.  Whereas females are never found alone.
  • This breed has the smallest family groups of all gorillas, averaging 4-8 members.
  • Highly sociable, gorillas form strong attachments to family members.
  • One mature male, known as the Silverback, normally acts as leader and chief protector.
  • The western lowland gorilla inhabits dense rainforest throughout central Africa.
  • Western gorillas frequently stand upright, but walk in a hunched, quadruped fashion.
  • Feeding and resting through the day, gorillas build nests from bent branches or grasses each evening.
  • All gorillas are shy and retiring and will seek no trouble unless harassed.  But they will fiercely defend their family group when threatened.

Where to See the Gorillas

  • The forests of the Congo (Brazzaville) harbour the largest population of western lowland gorillas.
  • Odzalla-Kokoua National Park has the densest population and new lodges are beginning to open, making this area more accessible.

About Visiting the Gorillas

  • Getting to see the gorillas is not easy and there are no guarantees.
  • At least a moderate level of fitness is required as you will have to trek on foot through thick vegetation, often for several hours.
  • Local guides keep track of the animals, but they move daily and are not easy to track.  Visitors have been disappointed.
  • Your time with the gorillas is limited to 1 hour and facemasks may be required to prevent transmission of disease.
  • You may not use a flash, so choose your lens accordingly.

 

Chimpanzee

chimpanzee

Quick Facts

  • Chimpanzees are humans’ closest relatives, sharing 98% of our genes.
  • Highly sociable, chimps move in flexible groups of 15-80, called troops.
  • Agile climbers, chimps build nests high up in the trees to rest during the day and sleep at night.
  • During the day chimps move largely on the ground, either bipedally or knuckle-walking.
  • Bigger than you might think, the adult male weighs up to 70kg and reaches heights of 1.7 meters.
  • Largely vegetarian, chimps do supplement their diets with meat.  Males hunt in groups for small antelope, monkeys and baboons.
  • Extremely noisy creatures, chimps communicate through screams, pant hoots, squeaks and barks.

Where to See the Chimpanzees

  • Chimps are present throughout a number of African countries, but the best place to see them is in Tanzania or Uganda.
  • The Mahale Mountains National Park, in western Tanzania, has an estimated 1,000 chimps in residence.
  • Gombe Stream National Park, also in western Tanzania, is where Jane Goodall studied chimps and remains home to several groups of habituated chimps.
  • Kibale National Park in Uganda is home to 1,500 chimps.
  • Chimps can also be seen at Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Kyamburu Gorge in Uganda.

About Visiting the Chimpanzees

  • You will have to trek to find the chimpanzees and the length of the walk can vary from a wander to the back of the camp to a 10-hour trek.
  • Local guides stay in touch with the chimps day to day movements.  As long as you’re up to walking, it’s unusual for people not to see the chimps in a 3-day stay.
  • When you find the chimps you are often able to get in close proximity as they are habituated.
  • Your time with the chimps is limited to 1 hour and facemasks may be required to prevent transmission of disease.
  • You may not use a flash, so choose your lens accordingly.
  • Tracking chimps is easier in the wet season when they don’t roam so far, but the dry season (July – October) is better for photos as the foliage is less dense.

Finding The Big Five

Posted on January 21st, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Resources.

The term “big five” was coined by game hunters to refer to their most prized kills.  These five animals are considered the most ferocious when cornered, and so the most difficult to “bag”.

The mystique of the “big five” continues today, although tourists are more likely to shoot with their camera than a rifle.   Many of our clients head out on safari with these animals at the top of their “must see” list.   So here are some quick facts to consider.

 

African Lion

Lions in Kalahari

Quick Facts

  • Social animals, lions live in prides of several females, their young and a couple of males.
  • Female lions tend to hunt more than the males.
  • Lions ambush their prey rather than tracking and chasing.
  • Female lions synchronize the birth of their cubs and cooperate in raising them.
  • Females tend to stay with the pride for life.  Males will leave between 2 and 4 years of age.
  • The size and colour of a male lion’s mane shows other males how old he is.  The darker and larger the mane, the older the lion.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to catch a lion napping – they rest approximately 20 hours a day.
  • Lions can climb trees.  In certain areas lions will rest in trees to avoid buffalo and tsetse flies.

Best Places for an Encounter

Botswana: Okavango Delta & Linyanti River region.

South Africa:  Greater Kruger Area

Zambia: South Luangwa National Park & Kafue National Park.

Kenya: Masai Mara, Tsavo and Amboseli National Parks

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area & Katavi National Park.

 

African Elephants

Elephant Linyanti

Quick Facts

  • The African Elephant is the largest mammal in the word and can be 3 meters tall and weigh up to 6,000 kilos.
  • Elephants are vegetarian and consume 170 kilos of vegetation daily and drink 120 – 190 liters of waters.
  • Elephants live in woodlands, forest, deserts and savanna.  They are spread across 37 countries in sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Peaceful if left alone, elephants can be dangerous when they feel threatened.
  • Elephants are extremely social animals, living in family groups of up to 100 members, headed by a matriarch.
  • Elephants communicate using a variety of low frequency grumbles, which can be picked up as much as 10 kilometers away.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to catch an elephant snacking – they spend 16-18 hours a day eating.
  • Elephants prefer one tusk over another, just as humans are right or left-handed.

Best Places for an Encounter

Botswana: Linyanti River region, Mashatu and Okavango Delta

South Africa: Greater Kruger Area

Namibia: Etosha National Park

Zimbabwe: Hwange National Park & Mana Pools National Park

Kenya: Masai Mara, Tsavo, Meru and Amboseli National Parks

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park, Tarangire National Park, The Selous

Zambia: South Luangwa National Park & Lower Zambezi National Park

 

African Leopard

Leopard

Quick Facts

  • Leopards are shy, nocturnal animals that prefer not to be seen.  Their spots act as camouflage.
  • Leopards mark their territory with urine and faeces and by leaving claw marks on the bark of trees.
  • Leopards can climb, swim and live in a wider range of habitats than most other cats.  They prefer thick bush and riverine forests.
  • Smaller than a lion, the leopard is still a big cat!  And adult male can weigh up to 90 kilos.
  • Extremely fast and agile, a leopard can run at speeds over 55 kilometers per hour and jump as high as 3 meters straight up.
  • A leopard will stalk and pounce its prey rather than chase over long distances.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to spot a leopard in a tree – they use trees as observation platforms and to protect their kill from scavengers.  Don’t forget to look up!
  • The leopard’s spots are circular in East Africa and square in southern Africa.

Best Places for an Encounter

Botswana: Okavango Delta & Linyanti River region

South Africa: Greater Kruger Area

Zimbabwe: Hwange & Mana Pools National Parks

Kenya: Masai Mara and Samburu

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

Zambia: South Luangwa, Kafue & Lower Zambezi National Parks

 

African Rhino

Rhino

Quick Facts

  • There are two species of rhinoceros in Africa: the black rhino and the white rhino.
  • All rhinos are in fact grey.
  • What differentiates white and black rhino is the lips.  Black rhino have a prehensile lip to strip leaves from bushes and white rhino have a long, flat lip for grazing.
  • There are only 4,000 black rhino left in the wild.  They are usually solitary and live in savanna, shrub and tropical bush areas.
  • White rhinos are more numerous, with over 17,000 remaining.  They are more social and are heavily concentrated in southern Africa.
  • A charging rhino can reach speeds of up to 55 kilometers per hour.
  • An adult rhino can weigh up over 2,500 kilos.
  • Rhino horn is highly prized in traditional Asian medicine.  Increasing poaching to cash in on this demand has brought rhinos close to extinction.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to see a rhino in South Africa – over 80% of the African rhino population is concentrated in South Africa.
  • White rhinos derive their name from the Dutch word “weit”, meaning wide.  This reference is to the white rhino’s wide, square jaw.

Best Places for an Encounter

South Africa: Great Kruger Area

Namibia: Etosha National Park

Kenya: Lake Nakuru, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

Tanzania: Ngorongoro Crater

 

The Cape Buffalo

Buffalo herd from hot air balloon, Kafue, Zambia

Quick Facts

  • The buffalo is considered one of Africa’s most dangerous animals and is said to have killed more game hunters than any other animal.
  • Hunters have an adage that says the buffalo never forgets.  They are known to ambush hunters that have injured them in the past.
  • Left alone and unthreatened, buffalo tend to be quite placid.
  • Buffalo are exclusively grazers.
  • On open grasslands they appear in large herds of up to 1,000.
  • The number of buffalo is shrinking due to hunting and domestic cattle diseases.  There are thought to be 1 million left in Africa.
  • When chased by predators the herd sticks close together, marshaling the young into the centre for protection.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to see a buffalo with a bird on its back – the Oxpecker bird keeps the buffalo clean by eating all the parasites that live in its thick hide.
  • Buffalo will engage in mobbing behaviour to fight off predators, especially if a calf cries for help.  They have been known to kill a lion.

Best Place for an Encounter

Botswana: Okavango Delta & Linyanti River region.

South Africa: Greater Kruger Area

Zimbabwe: Hwange & Mana Pools National Park

Kenya: Masai Mara & Amboseli National Park

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park & Katavi National park

Zambia: South Luangwa & Lower Zambezi National Park

 


Cape Town & Winelands, South Africa

Posted on May 25th, 2013 by Mike Haines in Safaris: South Africa.

Cape Town and the picturesque regions nearby, provide the ideal beginning or end to a southern Africa safari. Four or five days touring along the coast and winelands are easily connected with Botswana, Victoria Falls or Kruger. Stunning scenery, excellent wines and cuisine are an important part of a Cape tour. For the adventurous and energetic, there are Great White Shark safaris, hikes up Table Mountain, cycling through the winelands and whale watching. The Cape has a bit everything for everyone.
Some of the best hotels in the world are here; take your pick from intimate boutique style to major hotel brands. Continue reading …



General Terms and Conditions

Posted on May 21st, 2013 by Kevin Walker in .

Please read the following information to ensure that you fully understand all booking terms and conditions, how payments are made, our cancellation policy and our insurance waiver.

1. How to Book

a) Fill out the reservation forms and send them to Savuti Safari & Company Inc. (“Savuti” or the “Company”) together with a non-refundable deposit of 20% of safari itinerary cost. On receipt of your signed reservation form and deposit, we will, subject to availability, reserve your place on your selected safari itinerary. Once you receive your confirmation invoice, your reservation is confirmed and accepted by us.
b) Final payment is due to Savuti not later than 8 weeks prior to departure. On receipt of your full payment, we will send vouchers, safari information, clothing lists, etc. Please ensure that you receive the information before you leave on safari.

2. Cancellation

Cancellations are only effective on receipt of written notification. If cancellation is prior to 8 weeks before departure your deposit is forfeited. If your cancellation is made after the due date for full payment of your tour fare, charges will be levied. The scale of charges, expressed as a percentage of the tour prices, is as follows:
More than 8 weeks notice ~ Deposit forfeited;
Less than 8 weeks notice ~ Deposit plus 25%;
Less than 4 weeks notice ~ 50%;
Less than 3 weeks notice ~ 60%;
Less than 2 weeks notice ~ 100%.
Should you fail to join a safari or join it after departure or leave it prior to its completion, no safari fare refund can be made.

3. If you Change Your Booking

After your booking has been confirmed, should you wish to make any changes to your itinerary or wish an earlier departure date, we will make every effort to accommodate your requests based on availability. However, there may extra costs involved to accommodate your request. These costs are in addition to the fee quoted to your for your initial safari. Normal cancellation fees apply if you wish to postpone your departure.

4. Insurance

It is a condition of booking, that the sole responsibility lies with the guest to ensure that they carry the correct comprehensive travel and medical insurance to cover themselves, as well as any dependants/travelling companions for the duration of their trip to Africa. This insurance should include cover in respect of, but not limited to, the following eventualities: can-cellation or curtailment of the safari, emergency evacuation expenses, medical expenses, repatriation expenses, damage/theft/loss of personal baggage, money and goods. Savuti, including their representatives, employees and agents will take no responsibility for any costs, losses incurred or suffered by the guest, or guest’s dependants or travelling companions, with regards to, but not limited to, any of the above mentioned eventualities. Guests will be charged directly by the relevant service providers for any emergency services they may require, and may find themselves
in a position unable to access such services should they not be carrying the relevant insurance cover. Savuti can upon request provide insurance quotes for both RBC Insurance and Travel Guard Insurance.

Guests not wishing to purchase compre-hensive travel and medical insurance, will be asked to sign a liability release form.

5. Methods of Payment

We accept MasterCard, Visa, Canadian and US cheques, Wire transfers, Money Orders and Bank Drafts.

6. Baggage

For safety and because space is restricted, baggage in some charter aircraft is restricted to a maximum of 15 kg per person in a soft bag. This includes camera equipment and carry-on baggage. Should guests arrive with excess baggage without prior warning their baggage could be delayed, as we may have to fly the baggage into camps at a later stage at considerable extra cost to you. However, should the guests know in advance that the baggage will exceed the limit; we can usually book an extra seat for the bags on the aircraft, at an additional cost to them.

7. Wild Animals

Please be aware that these safaris may take you into close contact with wild animals. Attacks by wild animals are rare, but no safari into the African wilderness can guarantee that this will not occur. Neither Savuti, nor their employees, can be held responsible for any injury or incident on the safari. Please note that most safari camps in Africa are not fenced.

8. Passport & Visas

The onus is upon the guest to ensure that passports and visas are valid for the countries visited. Savuti and their staff cannot be held liable for any visas, etc. not held by the guests, nor the cost of visas.

9. Health

Tropical Disease precautions should be commenced prior to departure. Please consult our doctor for specific advice. If you are a contagious-disease carrier, you must let us know when booking your safari.

10. Not Included

(This varies from itinerary to itinerary) Insurance to cover for cancellation and curtailment, medical, baggage and money, emergency evacuation back home; beverages in certain areas; personal laundry at certain camps; gratuities to guides, paddlers and to staff; any excursion not related to the safari; optional meals in Victoria Falls and the bigger towns and cities; scheduled airfares; transfers and departure taxes.

11. Responsibility

Neither Savuti nor any person or agent acting for, through or on behalf of the Company shall be liable for any loss or damage whatsoever arising from any cause whatsoever and without restricting the generality of the afore-going shall particularly not be responsible for loss or damage arising from any errors or omissions contained in its brochure or other literature, loss or damage caused by delays, sickness, theft, injury or death.

In addition the Company shall have the right at any time at its discretion to cancel any safari or the remainder thereof or make any alteration in route, accommodation, price or other details and, in the event of any safari being rendered impossible, illegal or inadvisable by weather, strike, war, government or interference or any other cause whatsoever, the extra expenses incurred as a result thereof shall be the responsibility of the passenger. The Company may at its discretion and without liability or cost to itself at any time cancel or terminate the guest’s booking and in particular without limiting the generality of the afore-going it shall be entitled to do so in the event of the illness or the illegal or incompatible behaviour of the guest, who shall in such circumstances not be entitled to any refund. The person making any booking will, by the making of such booking, warrant that he or she has authority to enter into a contract on behalf of the other person included in such a booking and in the event of the failure of any or all of the other persons so included to make payment, the person making the booking shall by his/her signature thereof assume personal liability for the total price of all bookings made by him/her.

12. Changes to Schedules

Although every effort is made to adhere to schedules it should be borne in mind that the Company reserves the right and in fact is obliged to occasionally change routes and camps on safaris as dictated by changing conditions. Such conditions may be brought about by seasonal rainfall on bush tracks, airfields and in game areas, by game migrations from one region to another, or airline or other booking problems, etc.

13. Refunds

Whilst the Company uses its best endeavours to ensure that all anticipated accommodation is available as planned, there shall be no claim of any nature whatsoever against the Company for a refund either in the whole or part, if any accommodation or excursion is unavailable and a reasonable alternative is not found. If the guest is unable to use any service provided in the itinerary, then there are no refunds due.

14.Flights

The Company can book scheduled airline flights to, from and within Africa via a flight consolidator. However, please note that a service fee will apply. We cannot be held responsible for any schedule changes, flight delay or flight cancellations that occur to your flights and that consequently affect your travel arrangements.

15. Airline Clause

The airlines concerned are not to be held liable for any act, omission or event during the time the passengers are not on board their planes or conveyance. The passengers’ tickets in use by the airline or by other carriers concerned when issued shall constitute the sole contract between the airlines and the purchaser of these tickets and/or passengers. Please note that we subcontract the flying services to independent charter operations, and they are responsible for the flying.

16. Prices

We will do our utmost to keep to the prices as quoted. Should increases be forced on us by airlines, exchange rates, etc., we reserve the right to surcharge without notice.

17. Delays

We cannot be held liable for any delays or additional costs incurred as a result of airlines not running to schedule.

18.

If one of our guides is unable to take a safari due to illness, etc. we reserve the right to substitute with another guide.

19.

This agreement is made subject to and shall be governed by and construed according to the laws of the country in which the safari takes place. The company only makes your travel arrangements and acts merely as an agent for the operating companies.

20. Consent

The payment of the deposit OR any other partial payment for a reservation on a safari constitutes consent by all guests covered by that payment to all provisions of the conditions and general information contained in this document whether the guest has signed the reservation form or not. The terms, under which you agree to take these safaris, cannot be changed or amended except in writing signed by an authorized director of the Company.

22.Age limits in Camps and Lodges

We have no upper age limits in our camps but we respectfully request that only physically active people join these safaris! Camps do vary with respect to minimum age requirements. We will be able to advise which properties and operators allow younger children. Cross~ Country and Walking Safaris have a lower age limit of 12 and a maximum of 65, 70 or 75, depending on the level of difficulty of the safari.


Little Kwara Camp

Posted on April 18th, 2013 by Mike Haines in Safaris: Botswana.

Little Kwara is located next door to its larger sister camp, Kwara. This exclusive camp is located within the game rich Kwara concession, which borders the Moremi Game Reserve on the northern edge of the Okavango Delta. This is an intimate camp, accommodating no more than 10 guests (5 luxury tents). Continue reading …



Kalahari Plains Camp, Botswana

Posted on January 29th, 2013 by Mike Haines in Safaris: Botswana.

Kalahari Plains Camp is located in a prime location within the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. This area comes to life during the rains from December to May, with lush green grass on the valley floors attracting large concentrations of wildlife, including predators such as lion and cheetah.

We suggest two or three nights in the Kalahari, combined with a camp in the Okavango Delta.

Continue reading …



The Great Walk of Africa, Kenya

Posted on January 29th, 2013 by Mike Haines in Safaris: Kenya.

Following game trails you will make a 12 day crossing of the immense wilderness of Tsavo, Kenya, in a true explorer’s style safari. The route will take you along the courses of both the Tsavo and Galana Rivers, moving camp every day, and experiencing Africa’s unique wildlife and birdlife. Tsavo is big game country: elephant, Cape buffalo, hippo, lion and leopard.

Continue reading …



Contact us

Posted on January 10th, 2013 by Morgan in .

Safari & Company

Toronto, Canada

T: 416 642-0712
F: 416 507-9874
1 800 303-6799

Comments or questions are welcome.

* (denotes required field)
Please enter your E-mail Address a second time.

Frequently asked questions

Posted on January 10th, 2013 by Mike Haines in .

How safe is the safari?

Whilst there is an inherent risk whilst travelling on safari and in Africa, it is no more dangerous than travelling anywhere else in the world. You will be in wildlife rich areas most of the time you are on safari and will come into relatively close contact with wild animals. The camps are, however, safe and the guides that will be accompanying you are well trained. Very good medical air rescue services are available and the camps and lodges are in good radio contact with them at all times.

What about malaria?

Mosquitoes which carry malaria are prevalent in most areas of Sub-Saharan Africa. They will mainly be encountered in Southern Africa during the hot wet season of November to March. During the drier months of the year (May – October), there are not may mosquitoes around. You should still see your doctor for a prophylactic before traveling to Africa at any time of the year.

What immunizations do I need before going on Safari?

Vaccinations that need to be considered are Hepatitis A & B and Typhoid, we suggest you contact a travelers clinic for specific recommendations for the country you are traveling to. A Yellow Fever vaccination is required if you are traveling to Zanzibar. We can provide contact numbers for a travel medicine clinic in your city.

Will we have electricity?

Power in the lodges varies from area to area; for the most part 12 volt battery power is provided, which is charged by generators whilst you are out of camp during the day. You will be able to charge your camera batteries whilst staying in a lodge. On the camping and canoeing safaris the lights are limited to hurricane lamps and flashlights, for charging batteries etc. you can use an adapter to plug into the vehicle power outlet.

Is the water safe to drink while on Safari?

All the camps and lodges that we use in Africa supply filtered and bottled water. We do encourage people not to over use the bottled water, for enviromental reasons; it is always a good idea to take a personal water flask with you, which can be filled up by the camps clean water supply.

What about visas?

Canadian and American citizens are required to purchase visas to enter Zimbabwe, Zambia, Kenya and Tanzania. Visas can be purchased through the relevant embassey or high commission prior to travel or on arrival at port of entry of the country you are visiting.

At this time there are no costs for entry visas to Botswana, Namibia or South Africa.

What are the visa fees?

These fees change all the time. We will advise you of the current visa requirements per country. Please also see the links page for embassy details.

Are there any luggage restrictions?

Due to the use of light aircraft for flights between camps in all countries, strict weight limits on luggage are enforced for safety reasons. In Botswana, on some trips in Namibia and in Zambia you are limited to 20kgs (44lbs) per person if flying with Sefofane Air Charters. In Kenya & Tanzania the limit is 15kgs (33lbs) and for all other countries 12kgs (26lbs) is the limit. These limits include camera equipment.

Bear in mind that laundry can be done almost on a daily basis, so 3 or 4 changes of clothes are usually sufficient.

Do I need travel insurance?

Cancellation, interruption and emergency medical travel insurance is essential to protect your investment. Travel insurance should be purchased when you confirm your safari with a deposit. We can provide you with applicable coverage through RBC Insurance or Travel Guard.

Please note that emergency medical coverage is a condition of booking a trip with Safari & Company to Africa.

What type of camera will I need for a African Safari?

If you are going to buy a new camera for your African safari, then I suggest you buy a digital SLR camera. Both Nikon and Canon produce very good, affordable digital SLRs. You will need a good size telephoto zoom lens, at the very least a 200mm lens, and ideally a 300mm lens. Nikon and Canon also have lenses with new technology called Vibration Reduction on Nikon and Image Stabilization with Canon. These lenses have a feature which you can turn on to reduce the old problem of camera shake.

Do I need binoculars?

Binoculars are very important. You will not always have the animals under your nose! A good pair of 8 x 30 or 8 x 42 would be ideal. The small pocket pairs can become frustrating to use unless they are a very good make.

Can we use our own itinerary?

Absolutely, we specialize in tailor-made itineraries. We thrive on custom designing interesting itineraries!

How do you get to Africa?

From North America you can fly via a European city such as London, Amsterdam or Frankfurt. You can also fly direct to South Africa from New York or Washington DC. The two main hubs in Africa are Johannesburg in South Africa or Nairobi in East Africa. You can fly direct from Europe into other African cities such as Cape Town, Dar es Salaam, Kilimanjaro and Lusaka. You would fly into the nearest African city from where your safari starts. From there we organize flights to smaller airports.


Lioness gets technical

Posted on November 26th, 2012 by Mike Haines in Blog.

Ed Hetherington and his wife are just home from a week and a half in Zimbabwe at Little Makalolo and Ruckomechi camps.

As Ed says, ‘We had a fantastic time!’ Continue reading …