Search Results for "13"


Camp Amalinda: Refuge in a Granite Wilderness

Posted on June 12th, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Safaris: Zimbabwe (camps).

Camp AmalindaThe Matobo Hills has some of the most breathtaking granite scenery in the world.  Tucked in amongst the imposing boulders is Amalinda Camp, an exclusive, tranquil refuge.

Amalinda’s nine individually thatched units each have a distinctive look and feel. Showers and toilets are built right into the granite rock face.  Shared lounge, dining and library spaces are uniquely designed to capture the feeling of this granite wilderness.

Rock Art in Matobo HillsThese hills, where the nomads once held sacred ceremonies, are home to a wide array of mammals and birds.  The highest concentration of leopard and black eagle in the world is found here, and there is a healthy population of the endangered black and white rhino.

There is plenty to keep you busy in the Matobo Hills:  go rhino tracking, visit the tomb of Cecil John Rhodes, explore the granite hills and discover the millennia old rock art of the San Bushmen.  But Amalinda is also a special place to relax.  Whether you are lazing in the lounge or library, or treating yourself to a massage at the safari spa, you will be touched by the tranquility and spiritual energy of this place.

 

Photography and video compliments of Amalinda


Singita Pamushana Lodge: Africa’s Magical & Luxurious Secret

Posted on June 12th, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Safaris: Zimbabwe (camps).

Singita Pamushana LodgeThe Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve is a 150,000 acre conservation area, established to protect and manage the extraordinary wilderness and wildlife in this part of southeastern Zimbabwe.

The Singita Pamushana Lodge is the ecotourism arm of the reserve, and one of the most magical secrets on the African continent.

The setting is magnificent, with the lodge built amongst forests of Mopane and Baobab trees and overlooking the serene lake formed by the Malilangwe dam.  There are six luxury suites and one five-bedroom villa, each with a private pool and extraordinary views.

Trekking Game Near Singita PamushanaTeeming with birds and wildlife, The Malilangwe Wildlife Reserve holds one of the highest concentrations of black rhino in Africa, fourteen different species of eagle, and endangered species such as the roan and sable antelope.

The magnificence of the landscape and the abundance of wildlife can be appreciated from the comfort of the lodge, or head out on a game drive, safari walk, sundowner cruise or mountain bike ride.   Unlike other camps that follow a strict routine, how you plan your day is completely up to you.

 

View from Singita PamushanaIf you tire of the views and the wildlife then play tennis on one of the lodge’s two tennis courts, set out on a fishing trip, head to the gym, relax in the spa, visit the 2 millenia old San rock paintings, or experience some local Shangaan culture.

But leave time to enjoy the exquisite food and wines. Pamushana Lodge is one of the continent’s most influential collectors of wines, with a cellar stocked with some of Africa’s most sought after reserves.

Everything is impeccable at Pamushana, but it is possibly its passion and its people that set this lodge above others of its kind.  The level of service is exceptional.  Your every whim is met, often before you’ve even had a chance to articulate it.  And the passion for conserving this special place and developing the local villages gives this magical spot a special heart.

 

 

Photography and video compliments of Singita


Go Off the Beaten Track in Wildest Tanzania

Posted on April 24th, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Safaris: Tanzania.

8 Day Fly-in Safari in Katavi and Ruaha National Park

This 7-night safari idea takes you well off Tanzania’s beaten track, to explore the western and central parts of the country.  You can be assured that you won’t be waiting in any queues as you explore the wide-open floodplains of Katavi National Park and the dramatic landscapes and massive baobabs of Ruaha National Park.

Katavi Buffalo HerdDay 1 to 5:  The Floodplains of Katavi

From Arusha Airport you travel west on a charter flight to Katavi.  Even today few people visit this part of the world, and you will sense its untouched beauty even as fly across the open spaces.  As you soar across the vast plains of yellow grasses you will have trouble spotting the 6-tent, eco-friendly Chada Katavi camp that will be your home for the next 4 nights.

The camp is stylish but has the simple feel you would expect in a remote bush camp.  Your comfortable tent is wide open to the glorious landscape, with the comforts of an ensuite bathroom and safari-style bucket shower.

You may need to share the camp with elephants, who are frequent visitors.  And looking out of your tent each morning, don’t be surprised by the vast herds of buffalo who frequently graze right in front of the camp.

The game is everywhere so you don’t have to leave the comfort of your tent to see all kinds.  But you will want to venture beyond the camp on the shared walks and game drives, including a night game drive.

Ruaha National ParkDay 5 to 8:  The Elephants and Baobabs of Ruaha

You fly from Katavi to Ruaha Msembe, entering Tanzania’s second largest national park.  Ruaha National Park, right in the heart of Tanzania, covers 13,000 square kilometers of rocky escarpments, hills dotted with baobabs, open savannah and the great Ruaha River.

You will transfer to the 12-bed tented Kigelia Ruaha on the edge of Ifuguru Sand River.  The camp is light, making minimal impact upon its surroundings.  But it’s still stylish and comfortable with large beds, ensuite bathrooms and a wonderful shared “pavilion” tent for dining and relaxing.

This area offers a unique variety of animal, bird and plant life, being a transition zone where southern and eastern species overlap.  Famous for it’s 10,000-strong elephant population, it is also home to the Greater and Lesser Kudu, Sable and Roan antelope, giraffe, zebras and, of course, the predators that follow: lions, leopards, cheetah and jackal.  With over 570 bird-species, the area is a bird-watchers paradise.

Day 8: 

You fly back from Ruaha Msembe to Arusha Airport leaving the remote corners of Tanzania behind.

As with all our safari ideas, this has been designed to spark your imagination.  All aspects of this itinerary can be adjusted to suit you.  We want you to discover your own Africa!


Adventures in Zambia’s Remotest Corners

Posted on April 24th, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Safaris: Zambia.

11 Days Fly-in Safari on the Lower Zambezi and Luangwa River

ZambiaFlightMapHere’s a safari idea for those who want to discover the adventurous heart of Africa.  Spend 10 nights exploring some of Zambia’s most exciting landscapes.  Fly in to the remote corners of the country and explore by foot, canoe and bicycle.

Day 1 to 3:  Luxury & Adventure on the Lower Zambezi

Fly from the capital Lusaka to Jeki airport near the Lower Zambezi National Park.  From the airport you will be transferred to Chiawa Camp, a family owned, award-winning safari camp.  Over the next 2 nights you will bask in the luxury of your beautifully appointed “tent”, personalized service and views of the Zambezi River.

You can watch the plentiful game just sitting on your private sundeck, but you will also have the option to explore further afield with twice daily game drives, walking trips, canoeing, boating and angling opportunities – all led by some of Africa’s best guides.

Microlighting in TafikaDay 3 to 6: Go Bush!

Remaining on the Lower Zambezi, you will transfer to the very intimate bush camp of Old Mondoro.  With only 8 beds this has to be one of the most private ways to experience the African bush.  Overlooking a maze of hippo-inhabited islands on the mighty Zambezi and frequently visited by elephants, this bush camp has a real sense of adventure.

Day 6 to 8:  Remote ExplorationsChikoko Camp

Fly in a 3-seater charter plane from Jeki to Lukuzi in South Luangwa National

Park – now you are entering the truly remote corners of this amazing country.  You will be transferred to the intimate Tafika Camp, with its six comfortable ensuite chalets.

Here you can combine exceptional game viewing with exciting daily activities.  Take a microlight flight over the ever-changing Luangwa River, discover the abundant wildlife on a mountain bike safari or visit the local village of Mkasanga.

Walking Safari ZambiaDay 8 to 11: The Walk of a Lifetime

We transfer from Tafika to the incredible Chikoko Trails Camps: two exquisite camps in a walking paradise.  You will stay at the Chikoko Tree Camp, before setting out to walk to the Crocodile River Camp, following the well-worn elephant and hippo trails through the Luangwa Valley.  All luggage and supplies is portered into the camps so you can focus on walking and watching the wildlife.

Day 11:

We fly by small charter plane from Lukuzi to Mfuwe, before catching a scheduled flight from Mfuwe back to Lukasa.  Your trip has come to an end, but the memories will be seared in your memory for eternity.

 

As with all our safari ideas, this has been designed to spark your imagination.  All aspects of this itinerary can be adjusted to suit you.  We want you to discover your own Africa!


Visas for Safari

Posted on January 22nd, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Resources.

Latest update:  12 November, 2013

The requirement for visas is always changing.  We summarise below the visa requirements for Canadian  & American citizens as of our latest update.  We will provide you with specific visa advice at the time of booking.  If you are not booking through us and using this as a guide, we strongly recommend that you double check with the relevant consular offices before travelling.

One thing that never changes is the African love affair with passport stamps.  Make sure you have adequate un-used pages in your passport and assume that every country you visit will require at least one full page for visas and stamps.

Also ensure that your passport expiry date is at least 6-months after the conclusion of your trip.

 

Botswana

Canadians & Americans do not require a visa to visit Botswana for up to 90 days.

Kenya

Canadian and American passport holders require a visa to visit Kenya.  You can apply for the visa before you leave, or have one issued on arrival.

Depending on your itinerary you may need a Transit, Single or Double Entry visa.  We will advise you at the time of booking which visa you will require.

Fees and Application Download – Canada

Fees and Application Download – USA

 

Mozambique

Canadian and American passport holders require a visa to visit Mozambique and you must apply for the visa before leaving Canada.

Depending on your itinerary you may need a Single or Double Entry visa.  We will advise you at the time of booking which visa you will require.

Fees and Application Download – Canada

Fees and Application Download – USA

 

Namibia

Canadian and American passport holders do not require a visa to visit Namibia for up to 90 days.

 

Rwanda

American passport holders do not require a visa to visit Rwanda for up to 90 days.

Canadians require a visa to visit Rwanda and you must apply for the visa before leaving Canada.

Fees and Online Application – Canada

 

South Africa

Canadian and American passport holders do not require a visa to visit South Africa for up to 90 days.

 

Tanzania

Canadian and Americans do require a visa to visit Tanzania. You can apply for the visa before you leave, or have one issued on arrival.

Fees and Application Download – Canada

Fees and Application Download – USA

 

Uganda

Canadian and American passport holders require a visa to visit Uganda and you must apply for the visa before you leave.

Depending on your itinerary you may need a Single or Double Entry visa.  We will advise you at the time of booking which visa you will require.

Fees and Application Download – Canada

Fees    Application Download – USA

 

Zambia

Canadian and American passport holders require a visa to visit Zambia.  You can apply for the visa before you leave, or have one issued on arrival.

Depending on your itinerary you may need a Single or Double Entry visa.  We will advise you at the time of booking which visa you will require.

Fees and Application Download – Canada

Fees and Application Download – USA

 

Zimbabwe

Canadian and American passport holders require a visa to visit Zimbabwe, which can be applied for before leaving, or obtained on arrival.

Fees and Application Download


Finding The Apes

Posted on January 21st, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Resources.

Perhaps the most fascinating, irresistible and charming creatures in Africa are the Apes.  Hidden in the dense jungle and rainforest areas, Africa’s gorillas and chimpanzees require time and effort to visit.  But the rare opportunity to share time with our distant cousins will be one of the highlights of your safari.

Mountain Gorilla

Gorilla gorilla beringei  Mountain gorilla

Quick Facts

  • The largest living primate, an adult male gorilla can be 1.8 meters tall and weigh 180kg.
  • Gorillas live in family groups, called troops, with up to 30 members.
  • Highly sociable, gorillas form strong attachments to members of their troop.
  • One mature male, known as the Silverback, normally acts as leader and chief protector.
  • Gorillas inhabit dense forest and rainforest, wandering over a 15-25km home range.
  • Feeding and resting through the day, gorillas build nests from bent branches or grasses each evening.
  • Gorillas are shy and retiring and will seek no trouble unless harassed.  But they will fiercely defend their family group when threatened.
  • Twenty-five distinct vocalizations are recognised and used for group communication in the dense vegetation.
  • There are only 880 mountain gorillas left in the world.

Where to See the Gorillas

  • Approximately 480 gorillas inhabit the Virunga Ranges.  This extinct volcanic region runs along the borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • The remaining gorillas inhabit Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in southwestern Uganda.

 About Visiting the Gorillas

  • Getting to see the gorillas is not easy and there are no guarantees.
  • At least a moderate level of fitness is required as you will have to trek through thick vegetation and up steep slopes in search of the gorillas.  The trek can last for several hours.
  • Local guides keep track of the animals, but they move daily and are not easy to track.  Visitors have been disappointed.
  • Your time with the gorillas is limited to 1 hour and facemasks may be required to prevent transmission of disease.
  • You may not use a flash, so choose your lens accordingly.
  • You will require an official permit to see the gorillas.

 

Western Lowland Gorilla

western lowland gorilla

Quick Facts

  • The smallest subspecies of gorilla, the average male still stands 1.6m tall and weighs 168 kg.
  • Compared to mountain gorillas there is a greater gender size difference, with females being half the size of males.
  • Endangered but far more common and widespread than the mountain gorillas.
  • Females don’t start reproducing until around 9 years old, and they generally have one offspring every 5 years.
  • When males reach maturity they go through a “bachelor stage” that can last several years.  Whereas females are never found alone.
  • This breed has the smallest family groups of all gorillas, averaging 4-8 members.
  • Highly sociable, gorillas form strong attachments to family members.
  • One mature male, known as the Silverback, normally acts as leader and chief protector.
  • The western lowland gorilla inhabits dense rainforest throughout central Africa.
  • Western gorillas frequently stand upright, but walk in a hunched, quadruped fashion.
  • Feeding and resting through the day, gorillas build nests from bent branches or grasses each evening.
  • All gorillas are shy and retiring and will seek no trouble unless harassed.  But they will fiercely defend their family group when threatened.

Where to See the Gorillas

  • The forests of the Congo (Brazzaville) harbour the largest population of western lowland gorillas.
  • Odzalla-Kokoua National Park has the densest population and new lodges are beginning to open, making this area more accessible.

About Visiting the Gorillas

  • Getting to see the gorillas is not easy and there are no guarantees.
  • At least a moderate level of fitness is required as you will have to trek on foot through thick vegetation, often for several hours.
  • Local guides keep track of the animals, but they move daily and are not easy to track.  Visitors have been disappointed.
  • Your time with the gorillas is limited to 1 hour and facemasks may be required to prevent transmission of disease.
  • You may not use a flash, so choose your lens accordingly.

 

Chimpanzee

chimpanzee

Quick Facts

  • Chimpanzees are humans’ closest relatives, sharing 98% of our genes.
  • Highly sociable, chimps move in flexible groups of 15-80, called troops.
  • Agile climbers, chimps build nests high up in the trees to rest during the day and sleep at night.
  • During the day chimps move largely on the ground, either bipedally or knuckle-walking.
  • Bigger than you might think, the adult male weighs up to 70kg and reaches heights of 1.7 meters.
  • Largely vegetarian, chimps do supplement their diets with meat.  Males hunt in groups for small antelope, monkeys and baboons.
  • Extremely noisy creatures, chimps communicate through screams, pant hoots, squeaks and barks.

Where to See the Chimpanzees

  • Chimps are present throughout a number of African countries, but the best place to see them is in Tanzania or Uganda.
  • The Mahale Mountains National Park, in western Tanzania, has an estimated 1,000 chimps in residence.
  • Gombe Stream National Park, also in western Tanzania, is where Jane Goodall studied chimps and remains home to several groups of habituated chimps.
  • Kibale National Park in Uganda is home to 1,500 chimps.
  • Chimps can also be seen at Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary and Kyamburu Gorge in Uganda.

About Visiting the Chimpanzees

  • You will have to trek to find the chimpanzees and the length of the walk can vary from a wander to the back of the camp to a 10-hour trek.
  • Local guides stay in touch with the chimps day to day movements.  As long as you’re up to walking, it’s unusual for people not to see the chimps in a 3-day stay.
  • When you find the chimps you are often able to get in close proximity as they are habituated.
  • Your time with the chimps is limited to 1 hour and facemasks may be required to prevent transmission of disease.
  • You may not use a flash, so choose your lens accordingly.
  • Tracking chimps is easier in the wet season when they don’t roam so far, but the dry season (July – October) is better for photos as the foliage is less dense.

Finding The Big Five

Posted on January 21st, 2014 by Stephanie Hunt in Resources.

The term “big five” was coined by game hunters to refer to their most prized kills.  These five animals are considered the most ferocious when cornered, and so the most difficult to “bag”.

The mystique of the “big five” continues today, although tourists are more likely to shoot with their camera than a rifle.   Many of our clients head out on safari with these animals at the top of their “must see” list.   So here are some quick facts to consider.

 

African Lion

Lions in Kalahari

Quick Facts

  • Social animals, lions live in prides of several females, their young and a couple of males.
  • Female lions tend to hunt more than the males.
  • Lions ambush their prey rather than tracking and chasing.
  • Female lions synchronize the birth of their cubs and cooperate in raising them.
  • Females tend to stay with the pride for life.  Males will leave between 2 and 4 years of age.
  • The size and colour of a male lion’s mane shows other males how old he is.  The darker and larger the mane, the older the lion.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to catch a lion napping – they rest approximately 20 hours a day.
  • Lions can climb trees.  In certain areas lions will rest in trees to avoid buffalo and tsetse flies.

Best Places for an Encounter

Botswana: Okavango Delta & Linyanti River region.

South Africa:  Greater Kruger Area

Zambia: South Luangwa National Park & Kafue National Park.

Kenya: Masai Mara, Tsavo and Amboseli National Parks

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area & Katavi National Park.

 

African Elephants

Elephant Linyanti

Quick Facts

  • The African Elephant is the largest mammal in the word and can be 3 meters tall and weigh up to 6,000 kilos.
  • Elephants are vegetarian and consume 170 kilos of vegetation daily and drink 120 – 190 liters of waters.
  • Elephants live in woodlands, forest, deserts and savanna.  They are spread across 37 countries in sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Peaceful if left alone, elephants can be dangerous when they feel threatened.
  • Elephants are extremely social animals, living in family groups of up to 100 members, headed by a matriarch.
  • Elephants communicate using a variety of low frequency grumbles, which can be picked up as much as 10 kilometers away.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to catch an elephant snacking – they spend 16-18 hours a day eating.
  • Elephants prefer one tusk over another, just as humans are right or left-handed.

Best Places for an Encounter

Botswana: Linyanti River region, Mashatu and Okavango Delta

South Africa: Greater Kruger Area

Namibia: Etosha National Park

Zimbabwe: Hwange National Park & Mana Pools National Park

Kenya: Masai Mara, Tsavo, Meru and Amboseli National Parks

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park, Tarangire National Park, The Selous

Zambia: South Luangwa National Park & Lower Zambezi National Park

 

African Leopard

Leopard

Quick Facts

  • Leopards are shy, nocturnal animals that prefer not to be seen.  Their spots act as camouflage.
  • Leopards mark their territory with urine and faeces and by leaving claw marks on the bark of trees.
  • Leopards can climb, swim and live in a wider range of habitats than most other cats.  They prefer thick bush and riverine forests.
  • Smaller than a lion, the leopard is still a big cat!  And adult male can weigh up to 90 kilos.
  • Extremely fast and agile, a leopard can run at speeds over 55 kilometers per hour and jump as high as 3 meters straight up.
  • A leopard will stalk and pounce its prey rather than chase over long distances.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to spot a leopard in a tree – they use trees as observation platforms and to protect their kill from scavengers.  Don’t forget to look up!
  • The leopard’s spots are circular in East Africa and square in southern Africa.

Best Places for an Encounter

Botswana: Okavango Delta & Linyanti River region

South Africa: Greater Kruger Area

Zimbabwe: Hwange & Mana Pools National Parks

Kenya: Masai Mara and Samburu

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area

Zambia: South Luangwa, Kafue & Lower Zambezi National Parks

 

African Rhino

Rhino

Quick Facts

  • There are two species of rhinoceros in Africa: the black rhino and the white rhino.
  • All rhinos are in fact grey.
  • What differentiates white and black rhino is the lips.  Black rhino have a prehensile lip to strip leaves from bushes and white rhino have a long, flat lip for grazing.
  • There are only 4,000 black rhino left in the wild.  They are usually solitary and live in savanna, shrub and tropical bush areas.
  • White rhinos are more numerous, with over 17,000 remaining.  They are more social and are heavily concentrated in southern Africa.
  • A charging rhino can reach speeds of up to 55 kilometers per hour.
  • An adult rhino can weigh up over 2,500 kilos.
  • Rhino horn is highly prized in traditional Asian medicine.  Increasing poaching to cash in on this demand has brought rhinos close to extinction.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to see a rhino in South Africa – over 80% of the African rhino population is concentrated in South Africa.
  • White rhinos derive their name from the Dutch word “weit”, meaning wide.  This reference is to the white rhino’s wide, square jaw.

Best Places for an Encounter

South Africa: Great Kruger Area

Namibia: Etosha National Park

Kenya: Lake Nakuru, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy

Tanzania: Ngorongoro Crater

 

The Cape Buffalo

Buffalo herd from hot air balloon, Kafue, Zambia

Quick Facts

  • The buffalo is considered one of Africa’s most dangerous animals and is said to have killed more game hunters than any other animal.
  • Hunters have an adage that says the buffalo never forgets.  They are known to ambush hunters that have injured them in the past.
  • Left alone and unthreatened, buffalo tend to be quite placid.
  • Buffalo are exclusively grazers.
  • On open grasslands they appear in large herds of up to 1,000.
  • The number of buffalo is shrinking due to hunting and domestic cattle diseases.  There are thought to be 1 million left in Africa.
  • When chased by predators the herd sticks close together, marshaling the young into the centre for protection.

Did You Know?

  • You are most likely to see a buffalo with a bird on its back – the Oxpecker bird keeps the buffalo clean by eating all the parasites that live in its thick hide.
  • Buffalo will engage in mobbing behaviour to fight off predators, especially if a calf cries for help.  They have been known to kill a lion.

Best Place for an Encounter

Botswana: Okavango Delta & Linyanti River region.

South Africa: Greater Kruger Area

Zimbabwe: Hwange & Mana Pools National Park

Kenya: Masai Mara & Amboseli National Park

Tanzania: Serengeti National Park & Katavi National park

Zambia: South Luangwa & Lower Zambezi National Park

 


Chris & Ruben: Wildlife, Beaches, Wine & Baths

Posted on December 12th, 2013 by Stephanie Hunt in Blog.

Chris and RubenChris and Ruben first travelled to Africa with Safari and Co in 2009and they vowed to return for Chris’s 50th. “We decided the trip would be 5-weeks, 1-week per decade,” he says.  Planning started in November 2012.  They wanted to see the wildebeest migration on the Masai Mara, the chimps in Tanzania, elephants and lions in Botswana,  wineries in South Africa…and spend some time at the beach.

“It was probably a bit challenging for Mike to organise all that,” acknowledges Chris.  But Safari and Co set the itinerary, arranged the details, selected the best camps and on the 10th of August 2013 Chris and Ruben departed Toronto for a once-in-a-lifetime safari.  They invite you to share some of their favourite pictures and stories and imagine yourself sipping a sundowner in the wilds of Africa.

Continue reading …


Travel the Classic Northern Route

Posted on September 3rd, 2013 by Mike Haines in Safaris: Tanzania.

9 Days in Manyara, Tarangire, Ngorongoro Crater and the vast Serengeti

The classic northern circuit of Tanzania, that includes Manyara, Tarangire, Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti. Experience these prime wildlife viewing areas with a private guide and safari vehicle. The guides we use are some of the best in Tanzania, and know each area intimately. Accommodation is in fabulous luxury tented camps, plus the stunning Lemai Serengeti Lodge to end. With the wildebeest migration being so dynamic, we can adapt the schedule to suit the season. Continue reading …



Enjoy Tented Luxury on Lake Manyara

Posted on September 2nd, 2013 by Mike Haines in Safaris: Tanzania.

Chem Chem Lodge

Chem Chem Lodge is a luxury tented lodge on the eastern shore of Lake Manyara, nestled amongst an oasis of palms with stunning panoramic views of the Rift Valley’s western escarpment. Continue reading …